Locomotive in the Anai Valley circa 2006

Some of the railway in and around Padang is still used to this day, although the majority of the line is now derelict.

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Cement trains still operate 24 hours per day, (up to 15 daily pairs of trains), on the 14 km section between the cement factory at Indarung and the port of Teluk Bayur. 

Padang signal tower

The line from Padang Panjang to Sawahlunto was isolated from Padang due to a landslide in the Anai valley which severely damaged a railway bridge connecting the west Sumatran capital of Padang and neighbouring Padang Panjang on Tuesday 30th March 2010. It has now been cleared and the line between Lubukalung and Padang Panjang is now in operation. 

A bridge in the Ania valley

Locomotives being serviced in Padang Panjang, November 2006

Padang Panjang railway yard July 2007

Remains of a steam locomotive in Padang Panjang, November 2006

The railway from Padang Panjang, through Bukittingi, to Payakumbuh has been derelict for many years with much of the railway line being built over.

Looking up the incline from Padang Panjang to Bukittingi, November 2006

Part of a tourist project for Sawahlunto was having a small museum established inside the old station building (built in 1918), with displays of photographs, models and small items relating to the railway. The museum was inaugurated on December 17, 2005

Sawahlunto Railway Museum October 2009

Steam locomotive in Sawahlunto used for tourist rides October 2009

The railway from Sawahlunto to Muaro has been unused for many years, with the lines being built over by the local villagers. The main line into town is being taken back by nature.

Railway leading into Muaro October 2009

Muaro Railway Station October 2009

A carriage left at Muaro railway station that has become a house October 2009

© 2019 by Farrell Family

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